Last edited by Shagor
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

6 edition of Rosenwald Schools of the American South found in the catalog.

Rosenwald Schools of the American South

by Mary S. Hoffschwelle

  • 149 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by University Press of Florida in Gainesville, Fla .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Southern States
    • Subjects:
    • Julius Rosenwald Fund -- Buildings -- Southern States,
    • African Americans -- Education -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century,
    • School buildings -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references and index.

      StatementMary S. Hoffschwelle ; foreword by John David Smith.
      SeriesNew perspectives on the history of the South
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsLC2802.S9 H64 2006
      The Physical Object
      Paginationp. cm.
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3432328M
      ISBN 100813029570
      LC Control Number2005058564

      Built in , the Pine Grove School is a wood-frame, one-story rectangular gable-front building with a V-crimp tin metal roof. The layout of the Pine Grove Rosenwald School is a variant of the typical Rosenwald two-room schoolhouse. The common characteristics of this school plan included the orientation of the building, light colored paint schemes, and [ ]. Later, he established the Rosenwald Fund to boost a massive school-building initiative in the south in the early 20th century. During a two-decade span roughly 5, schools were built for rural.

      SC African American Heritage Commission invites people to imagine going back-to-school in the early 20 th century. For many children in rural South Carolina, going back to school in the s meant a walk down dirt roads to wood-frame, one-story buildings, oriented to capture natural light because there was no electricity, with three to eight rooms in which children received formal education. In informal usage, a Rosenwald School was any of the more than five thousand schools, shops, and teacher homes in the United States that were built primarily for the education of African-American children in the South during the early twentieth century. The project was the product of the partnership of Julius Rosenwald, a Jewish-American clothier who became part-owner and president of Sears.

      Send Email. Recipient(s) will receive an email with a link to 'Review: The Rosenwald Schools of the American South, by Mary S. Hoffschwelle; African American Architects: A Biographical Dictionary ––, edited by Dreck Spurlock Wilson' and will not need an account to access the content.   The Rosenwald School project was the brainchild of the wizard of Tuskegee, BookerT. Washington, and the president and later chairman ofthe board ofSearS, Roebuck and Rosenwald. In the mid-i s, the shrewd business-minded Rosenwald dedicated himself to philanthropy, especially the cause of African American education.


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Rosenwald Schools of the American South by Mary S. Hoffschwelle Download PDF EPUB FB2

This item: The Rosenwald Schools of the American South (New Perspectives on the History of the South) by Mary S. Hoffschwelle Paperback $ Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).

Ships from and sold by 5/5(1). "The layers of this book are tied together by the extraordinary detail of the archival research [A] tribute to the multi-layered institution of the Rosenwald schools." --The Southern Quarterly "A welcome addition not only to the study of architectural history in the South but also to the topic of American school architecture.".

Hoffschwelle tells the story of a remarkable partnership to build model schools for black children during the Jim Crow era in the South. The Rosenwald program, which erected more than 5, schools and auxiliary buildings between andbegan with Booker T.

Washington, then principal of Tuskegee Institute, who turned for financing to Julius Rosenwald, president of Sears, Cited by: Get this from a library.

The Rosenwald Schools of the American South. [Mary S Hoffschwelle] -- "Mary S. Hoffschwelle tells the story of a remarkable partnership to build model schools for black children during the Jim Crow era in the South.

The Rosenwald program, which erected more than 5, ROSENWALD SCHOOLS Beacons for Black Education in the American South. From the s into the early s, more than school buildings were constructed in African American communities throughout 15 southern states.

Seed money came from Chicago philanthropist Julius Rosenwald, CEO of Sears, Roebuck and Company. Rosenwald Schools: Beacons for Black Education in the American South: Created by Dr. Tom Hanchett, Director of the Museum of the New South in Charlotte, NC, the site focuses on North Carolina but also contains a history of the Rosenwald Fund, all of.

Inside a Rosenwald School. Rosenwald Schools. Contributed by Phyllis McClure. Rosenwald schools were educational facilities built with the assistance of the Rosenwald rural school building program, an initiative to narrow racial schooling gaps in the South by constructing better, more-accessible schools for African Americans.

Rosenwald plans incorporated the most up-to-date designs in American rural school architecture. The six-teacher facility in this drawing was designed "to face north or south only;" most plans had two versions to accomodate schools facing in any direction.

A fascinating book detailing the collaboration of Julius Rosenwald, president of Sears, Roebuck, & Co., and Booker T. Washington in the building of schools for African American children in the segregated south. An especially good book for Black History s: Rosenwald tells the incredible story of Julius Rosenwald, the son of an immigrant peddler who never finished high school, who rose to become the President of Sears.

Influenced by the writings of the educator Booker T. Washington, this Jewish philanthropist joined forces with African American communities during the Jim Crow South to build 5,   Julius Rosenwald was one of the most significant figures in Southern black education.

Although Rosenwald was a successful businessman, his philanthropic work has always overshadowed his financial success. His involvement in providing grants to build schools for African Americans across the South, including Arkansas, contributed greatly to the creation of better educational opportunities.

Rosenwald Colored School, School District No. 6, Clarendon County. Courtesy of South Carolina Department of Archives and History. The Tom Crosby Oral History Collection, consisting of forty-four oral history interviews, explores African-American education in South Carolina during segregation.

The 4, “Rosenwald schools” for African American children, built across the South between andwere the result of a remarkable three-way, public-private partnership conceived by. The Olympian Sports Club on Portsmouth Boulevard in Portsmouth is a former Rosenwald school.

Rosenwald schools were built across the South between and to educate African American. Journal of American Ethnic History “The layers of this book are tied together by the extraordinary detail of the archival research [A] tribute to the multi-layered institution of the Rosenwald schools.”—Southern QuarterlyBrand: University Press of Florida.

The Rosenwald Schools of the American South Mary S. Hoffschwelle University Press of Florida 15 NW 15th Street, Gainsville, FL. Like other Rosenwald schools built in the rural landscapes of South Carolina, this one was constructed (in ) for the African American children of the district. More than $7, was raised in the community to combine with the Rosenwald appropriation of $1, The school was built on four acres and was served by five teachers.

[ ]. When Booker T. Washington, the famed African American educator, asked Julius Rosenwald, the wealthy president of Sears, Roebuck and Company and noted philanthropist, to help him build well-designed and fully equipped schools for black children, the face of education in the South changed for the better/5(7).

Booker T. Washington the Tuskegee Institute and Julius Rosenwald, philanthropist and president of Sears Roebuck, built state-of-the art schools for African-American children across the South.

The effort has been called the most important initiative to advance black education in. Retreat Rosenwald School, built inwas one of 10 Rosenwald Schools in Oconee County.

The 2-teacher, 3-room school served African American students in the Retreat community of Westminster. Construction costs were $2, of which $ came from the Julius Rosenwald Fund.

The school has a northwest/ southeast orientation, deviating from the conventional specs of [ ]. Julius Rosenwald: The Man Who Built Sears, Roebuck and Advanced the Cause of Black Education in the American South (Philanthropic and Nonprofit Studies) [Ascoli, Peter M.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Julius Rosenwald: The Man Who Built Sears, Roebuck and Advanced the Cause of Black Education in the American South (Philanthropic and Cited by: All three are part of a grassroots preservation movement that is rediscovering Rosenwald Schools, one of the more amazing stories in the history of American education.

THE ROSENWALD SCHOOLS blossomed from a problem, and a partnership. The problem was the sorry state of African American education in the South after Funding came from the Rosenwald fund, the local school district, and the local African American community that would be served by the school.

Before the Rosenwald schools, African American.